Wilting or watered?

Wilting or watered?

I went outside the other morning and saw my poor plants limp and wilted.

I knew just what they needed and gave them a big dose of water. About 30min later, they looked fantastic. You never would have known they had looked so sad only minutes before. 

As I witnessed the transformation, it got me thinking about people. Sometimes, you can see how “wilted” a person is. They seem worn out, drained, perhaps carrying the weight of the world (or burdens of others) on their shoulders.

If they decide to reach out and ask for help or take some time for “self-care” to rest, relax, and rejuvenate, you can easily see the transformation. At times, it is so obvious, that others will reach out to them and pour into them. It is then that the person must decide whether to accept the assistance, or continue to “tough it out” on their own.

Look at the plants again. You can see the difference that a little time, caring, and water made.  Can you imagine what a person who has been poured into could look like?  Perhaps…

  • the stress lines on their face would fade
  • they would stand a little taller
  • their eyes would sparkle
  • they might smile, or even laugh.

There are people who love to help others, but don’t realize that if they don’t take care of themselves (which means getting some rest and relaxation) that they may not continue to be healthy enough – mentally, emotionally, or physically – to continue to assist others.

Self-care is not selfish. It is a necessary part of caring for others. AND: asking for help is not a weakness!

So many people look at “help” as if people think of them as “weak.” I can tell you, asking for help is a strength. It takes courage to admit we could use some help. We have been raised to be fiercely independent. I often prefer to go it alone. However, I have learned my exhaustion point. The point where I need to step back and either say “no” to things, or “yes” to help.

If someone asks if they can help you with something, let them. They must see a need and want to meet it. Remember the movie, “Pay it Forward?”  Okay, maybe not the happiest story in the world, as the ending is sad, but the theory is on point. “See a need, meet a need.”  For that to work, people need to step up to assist others, and people need to accept the offer.

If you see a wilted plant (i.e., person) around you, water them (i.e., fill them up). If someone tries to fill you up, say “Thank you.”